Skills vs. Character: Which is More Important in Ministry Leaders?

By Kenneth Berding Apr. 2, 2014 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, Christian Education, Church Life, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament

Have you ever noticed how often we rank skills over character?

You’re seeking to hire someone for a job. Which is more important? Skills for the job, or the character of the one seeking the job? In almost every hiring situation, skills are the focus (though I have heard that Human Resources folks are increasingly Facebook and Instagram-stalking potential employees in an attempt to ascertain whatever they can about applicants’ private lives.)

I would like to suggest that in Christian ministry, character should be weighted over skills.

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¿Qué Piensan Hacer Usted y Su Iglesia Durante la Cuaresma?

By Octavio Esqueda Apr. 1, 2014 9:00 a.m. Christian Education, Church Life, Culture, Ministry and Leadership

La navidad y la pascua son los dos eventos claves en el calendario cristiano. En la navidad celebramos la encarnación de Hijo de Dios quien se hizo hombre y habitó entre nosotros. En la pascua recordamos la muerte y resurrección de Jesucristo. Aunque conmemoramos dos acontecimientos, la realidad es que ambos están unidos porque Jesús nació para morir y darnos vida a través de su resurrección de entre los muertos.  No se puede explicar la navidad sin la pascua y viceversa.

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What is Meant By “these ten times” in Numbers 14:20-23?

By Dave Talley Mar. 31, 2014 9:15 a.m. Old Testament

Numbers 14:20-23 states, “Then the Lord said, ‘I have pardoned them, according to your word. But truly, as I live, and as all the earth shall be filled with the glory of the LORD, none of the men who have seen my glory and my signs that I did in Egypt and in the wilderness, and yet have put me to the test these ten times and have not obeyed my voice, shall see the land that I swore to give to their fathers. And none of those who despised me shall see it.’” What is meant by “these ten times?”

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New Evidence for Inflation

By William Lane Craig Mar. 28, 2014 9:00 a.m. Philosophy

In the news I notice that the BICEP2 project has released some data that measures the polarization of the cosmic background radiation due to gravitational waves in the very first instances of the universes existence. Physicists seem to be getting excited as they claim it supports the multiverse theory. I am not familiar with the mathematics that underpins cosmogony so I was wondering if you had any comments on a few of their claims.

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Thoughts on the New Testament and Economics

By Scott Rae Mar. 24, 2014 9:00 a.m. Ethics, New Testament, Old Testament, Philosophy

Though the New Testament is not a textbook on economics, it was immersed in a particular economic environment and much of the New Testament teaching had implications for economic life. In the New Testament, Jesus takes up right where the Old Testament prophets left off. Care for the poor was just as important to Jesus as it was to the prophets. When the followers of John the Baptist (who was in prison at the time) asked Jesus if He was indeed the Messiah who was to come, He answered in terms that could have been taken right out of the prophets. He put it like this, “Go back to John (the Baptist) and tell him what you have seen and heard—the blind see, the lame walk, the lepers are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are being raised to life and the good news is being preached to the poor” (Matt. 11:4-5). The evidence that Jesus was who He claimed to be was not only that He did miracles, but who were the beneficiaries of those miracles were: the poor, marginalized and vulnerable. Similarly, when He spoke of final judgment and what would separate His true followers from the pretenders, He made it clear that how someone treats the poor is a critical indication of a person’s spiritual maturity. This is likely what Jesus meant when He said that, “I tell you the truth, when you did it to the least of these my brothers, you were doing it to me” (referring to feeding the hungry and taking in the needy, Matt. 25:40).

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Is the Argument from Fine-Tuning Presumptuous?

By William Lane Craig Mar. 21, 2014 9:00 a.m. Philosophy

Dr. Craig, I'm an atheist and I've long followed your debates. Though I'm not moved by your arguments I think you present and defend them well. One of these arguments, the fine tuning argument, seems to be quite presumptuous in it's attempt to explain life. It seems to me that it skips quite a few steps to land at a conclusion that life is an ultimate goal of the universe ...http://www.reasonablefaith.org/rr

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Are You an Anticipator or an Avoider?

By Gary McIntosh Mar. 20, 2014 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Ministry and Leadership

While watching a recent car race on television, I was impressed by the new technology that racing teams are using to improve performance.  Advanced computer technology now allows crew chiefs to monitor nearly every aspect—fuel usage, engine pressure, wheel alignment, and numerous other aspects—that affect the performance of the car.  In fact it’s possible to know the exact set up of an automobile so precisely that another car can be set up just like it.  With all of the technology, one might think that race cars would be set up so much alike that very little difference would be observed on race day.  But, some cars continue to do better at winning than others.

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