Posts from April 2016

Is the Universe an Object, and Does It Matter?

By William Lane Craig Apr. 29, 2016 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Philosophy

Dr Craig,

My question is based on your formulation of the argument from contingency, specifically, your restricted version of the PSR.

Restricted PSR: everything that exists has an explanation for its existence, whether in the nature of its own necessity or an external cause.

There are good reasons to prefer a restricted PSR over the strong version - it avoids the famous objection by Peter Van Inwagen, which argues that the PSR is false because it has the absurd consequence on making all facts necessary. I am aware that you have of Alexander Pruss's work on defending the strong version and am on the fence at the moment as to whether Inwagen's objection succeeds ...

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Misinterpreting the Thief (John 10:10)

By Gary Manning Jr Apr. 28, 2016 9:00 a.m. New Testament

In Jesus’ Shepherd Discourse in John 10, Jesus contrasts himself with “the thief.” “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life and have it in abundance.” If you hear this verse quoted in a sermon, or see how people use this verse online, you will usually hear that the thief is Satan. But is that what Jesus meant?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Does the Church Have a "Plausibility" Problem?

By Sean McDowell Apr. 27, 2016 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Church Life, Culture, Marriage and Family, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament

Since writing my book on Same-Sex Marriage, I have been reading almost every book I can get my hands on related to homosexuality and the church. While there are some great books, there has been a huge need for a book that addresses the “plausibility” problem. I recently came across the book Same-Sex Attraction and the Church by Ed Shaw, and was pleasantly surprised that it dealt with this exact issue with clarity and insight. In my view, this book is one of the top five most important books for Christians to read on the subject. Pastor Ed was kind enough to answer a few of my questions. Enjoy! ...

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What Can We Learn About Parenting From Paul’s Comments About the Law?

By Kenneth Berding Apr. 26, 2016 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, Christian Education, Marriage and Family, New Testament, Old Testament

Paul’s discussion of the Old Testament law in Romans and Galatians connects well with a practical life concern: How do we effectively parent our children? In particular, one question parents regularly face has to do with what part rules play in raising children. Since Paul actually uses the raising of children as an analogy to explain the role of the law (Galatians 3:24-26; 4:1-7; Romans 8:14-17), perhaps we should turn the analogy on its head and ask if there is anything we can learn about raising children from Paul’s teaching about the law ...

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What Does Jerusalem Have to Do with Washington D.C.?: Rethinking the Church’s Role in Law and Public Policy

By Thaddeus Williams Apr. 25, 2016 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Culture, Ethics, Ministry and Leadership

The summer of 2014 gave us the Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby on the side of religious liberty. The summer of 2015 witnessed another culturally controversial 5-4 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, which carries potentially ominous implications for religious liberty (particularly according to the dissents of Justices Roberts and Alito). Meanwhile, some legal scholars are forecasting a massive public policy paradigm shift in coming years over another hotly contested issue—the right to life. Fordham University’s Charles Camosy, as a case-in-point, sees such a dramatic shift as not only possible but indeed inevitable ...

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Deductive Arguments and Probability

By William Lane Craig Apr. 22, 2016 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Philosophy

Hello, Dr. Craig.

You have often said that a deductive argument is good if it meets two conditions: It is valid, and each premise is more probable than it's denial. Furthermore, in a recent newsletter, you said, "in a deductive argument the probability of the premises establishes only a minimum probability of the conclusion: even if the premises are only 51% probable, that doesn't imply that the conclusion is only 51% probable. It implies that the conclusion is at least 51% probable."

But why would the probability of a premise establish minimal probability of a conclusion? Shouldn't it establish maximal probability? ...

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Going On Retreat: The Role of Good Intentions in Spiritual Formation

By Steve Porter Apr. 21, 2016 9:00 a.m. Spiritual Formation

“It’s the thought that counts,” we say and, of course, thoughts do count. But the mere thought to do something—the desire and intention to do it—falls short of actually doing it. “I thought about getting you a birthday present, but … I didn’t.” And yet, there is something about the desire and intention to do good that is itself good. It is the right place to start. We desire and then intend to do something good and that desire/intention is an essential part of being a good person ...

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