Scott Rae

Business as Ministry: Work as a Reflection of God

By Scott Rae May. 31, 2017 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Ministry and Leadership, Theology

All legitimate work in the world has intrinsic value and God calls men and women to be faithful in working in various arenas as their service to Him. Of course, there are some limits to this, since it would difficult to see how God could call someone to produce pornography or engage in the illegal drug trade. But excluding those exceptions, God calls people to work in business, not only because of what it accomplishes, but because it has value in and of itself to God. Business is the work of God in the world in the same way that being a pastor is the work of God in the church and in the same way that missionary service is the work of God on the mission field. All have value to God because of the value of the work done, and that work is an intrinsically good thing that has value as it's done with excellence ...

Read More

Gene Editing and Designer Children

By Scott Rae Dec. 3, 2015 9:00 a.m. Culture, Ethics, Marriage and Family

This week in Washington, DC, the National Academy of Sciences is hosting a three-day conference- the International Summit on Human Gene Editing, to examine the implications of new gene editing technology. Through a new technology developed in the past year, gene editing is now being done. 

Read More

Recent Critiques of Philosophical Naturalism

By Scott Rae Apr. 27, 2015 9:00 a.m. Philosophy

In his 2012 book, Mind and Cosmos, philosopher Thomas Nagel, who is both an atheist and a philosophical naturalist (the view that all reality can be reduced to the material world alone) issues a stark conclusion (some would call it a terminal diagnosis) for naturalism due to its inability to account for some key aspects of human experience that many believe make human beings significant—namely, consciousness, rationality, and morality/moral properties ...

Read More

On the Objectivity of Morality

By Scott Rae Feb. 3, 2015 9:00 a.m. Ethics, Philosophy

We are moving in our culture toward a view of morality that renders moral values and virtues as no more than simply matters of opinion with no force or application beyond the individual who holds such a view.  The contrasts sharply with the notion of morality from a Christian worldview that insists that moral assessments are not only objective but also matters of truth and knowledge. As we celebrated MLK day a couple weeks ago, we should be reminded that King himself held that the moral values on which the civil rights movement was based, were objective and knowable by the average person in the streets.  He held that they were objective truths of morality, not subjective matters of individual preference ...

Read More

What’s the Purpose of a Christian Business? Can You Make a Profit and Make a Difference?

By Scott Rae Jun. 4, 2014 9:00 a.m. Culture, Ethics, Philosophy

Dr. Scott Rae tackles the question, "What is the appropriate role for business to play in society?"

 

Read More

Thoughts on the New Testament and Economics

By Scott Rae Mar. 24, 2014 9:00 a.m. Ethics, New Testament, Old Testament, Philosophy

Though the New Testament is not a textbook on economics, it was immersed in a particular economic environment and much of the New Testament teaching had implications for economic life. In the New Testament, Jesus takes up right where the Old Testament prophets left off. Care for the poor was just as important to Jesus as it was to the prophets. When the followers of John the Baptist (who was in prison at the time) asked Jesus if He was indeed the Messiah who was to come, He answered in terms that could have been taken right out of the prophets. He put it like this, “Go back to John (the Baptist) and tell him what you have seen and heard—the blind see, the lame walk, the lepers are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are being raised to life and the good news is being preached to the poor” (Matt. 11:4-5). The evidence that Jesus was who He claimed to be was not only that He did miracles, but who were the beneficiaries of those miracles were: the poor, marginalized and vulnerable. Similarly, when He spoke of final judgment and what would separate His true followers from the pretenders, He made it clear that how someone treats the poor is a critical indication of a person’s spiritual maturity. This is likely what Jesus meant when He said that, “I tell you the truth, when you did it to the least of these my brothers, you were doing it to me” (referring to feeding the hungry and taking in the needy, Matt. 25:40).

Read More

Thoughts on the Old Testament and Economics

By Scott Rae Jan. 14, 2014 9:00 a.m. Ethics, Old Testament, Philosophy

From the beginning, we learn that God created the world and called it good, making the material world fundamentally good (Gen. 1:31).  He further entrusted human beings with dominion over the earth—giving them both the privilege of enjoying the benefits of the material world, but also the responsibility for caring for the world.  We also learn that, from the beginning, God has implanted His wisdom into the world and given human beings the necessary tools to uncover His wisdom and apply it for their benefit (Proverbs 8:22-31).  God set human beings free to utilize their God-given intelligence, initiative and creativity in discerning and applying what the wisdom He embedded into the world—this is all a part of the responsible exercise of dominion over creation that brings innovation and productivity to benefit humankind.

Read More

Page 1 of 2

Biola University
13800 Biola Ave. La Mirada, CA 90639
1-562-903-6000
© Biola University, Inc. All Rights Reserved.