Uche Anizor

Introverts and the Church

By Uche Anizor Jul. 7, 2012 10:30 p.m. Church Life

Are introverts valued in the church? More and more writers are reflecting on that question. Here is a thoughtful post on the subject by a friend of mine.

 

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Where Should Theology “Begin”?

By Uche Anizor Jun. 18, 2012 9:41 p.m. Theology, Historical Theology

As one who is kind of obsessed with questions of method in theology, I found some summary comments by T. F. Torrance on the relation of history and tradition to theological formulation helpful. He writes:

No scientist ever begins his work de novo; while he works with the methodological questioning of what he has already known he builds on knowledge already achieved and engages in a movement of advance. But it is one of the worst characteristics of theological study, whether in biblical interpretation or in dogmatic formulation, that every scholar nowadays thinks he must start all over again, and too many give the impression that no one ever understood this or that until they came along.

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Seven Brief Thoughts on the Doctrine of Scripture

By Uche Anizor May. 15, 2012 8:46 p.m. Theology, Biblical Exposition

After a semester of teaching an undergrad course on Scripture and Tradition, a number of things emerged in our discussions that might be worth reflecting on regarding the Bible and its interpretation.

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What is Systematic Theology Really?

By Uche Anizor Mar. 6, 2012 6:45 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Biblical Exposition

Check out this excellent and thought provoking post by theologian Stephen Holmes from St. Andrews.

Read the post here

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Bavinck on Scripture, Tradition, and Theology

By Uche Anizor Feb. 23, 2012 9:15 p.m. Theology, Historical Theology

Herman Bavinck helpfully (as usual) comments on a proper way to understand “tradition” and its relationship to Scripture and theology:

“[F]or a correct understanding [of the Bible] it still often requires a wide range of historical, archaeological, and geographical skills and information. The times have changed, and with the times people, their life, thought, and feelings, have changed. Therefore, a tradition is needed that preserves the connectedness between Scripture and the religious life of our time. Tradition in its proper sense is the interpretation and application of the eternal truth in the vernacular and life of the present generation. Scripture without such a tradition is impossible . . ."

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Patristic vs. Modern Trinitarianism

By Uche Anizor Feb. 16, 2012 5:07 p.m. Theology, Historical Theology

Mark Thompson of Moore College offers some helpful observations regarding the difference between patristic and modern treatments of the Trinity. Here's an excerpt:

Patristic trinitarian thinking and writing appears more overtly biblical, and specifically more exegetical, than much modern writing. Sometimes that exegetical work is tortuous and repetitive, as in some of Athanasius' orations against the Arians. Sometimes it is crisp and leaves important questions unanswered. Yet the Bible is in the foreground rather than in the background in many of the patristic treatments of the doctrine. In contrast, much of the modern discussion glances off the Bible and shies away from sustained exegetical comment.

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Union with Christ and Social Justice

By Uche Anizor Feb. 9, 2012 10:36 p.m. Theology

Does our union with Christ have anything to say about Christian social justice? Todd Billings in chapter 4 of Union with Christ makes this vital connection

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