Posts in Apologetics

Evolution Without God

By William Lane Craig Nov. 21, 2014 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Philosophy

This is the weekly Q & A blog post by our Research Professor in Philosophy, Dr. William Lane Craig:

While taking an anthropology course at San Jose State University about 10 years ago, the instructor took a poll on the first day of class asking students if that we were there because:

1) God created the world that we know including humans in their present form.

2) God guiding evolution to present times.

3) Evolution without God via chance and natural selection.

The instructor ended the survey by saying that by the end of the course he would convince the class that #3 is, in fact, the truth. One of the examples that he used was the argument involving vestigial limbs and body parts. He pointed to humans resembling tadpoles with tails in the embryo state, whales with hip joints, dogs with toes high on their legs that are useless, genetic trail showing that a horse's hoof is really the middle toe that continued to grow longer than the others, etc.

I would love to hear Dr. Craig's answer to such evidence. I have been strengthened by your ministry and I will continue to support it. Please feel free to paraphrase my question to correct any grammatical errors.

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The Authority of the Bible, Part One

By David Horner Aug. 27, 2014 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Biblical Exposition, New Testament, Theology

How could it be reasonable to base my life on an ancient book (the Bible was written between 2000 and 3500 years ago)? Indeed, how could it be reasonable to base my life on any book? I should think for myself. To live by someone else’s instructions is to surrender my own mind and personality. That approach produces mindless drones, cultists and terrorists.

Yet for two millennia, followers of Jesus from every culture and language have followed the Bible as their authority, from simple folks to some of history’s most influential scholars and intellectuals, from poor people with no political power to those in positions of great influence. And the world is radically different as a result.

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Is the Bible Wrong about Camels in Genesis?

By Kenneth Way Feb. 19, 2014 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Biblical Exposition, Old Testament

Recent news reports[1] are claiming that the references to camels in the patriarchal narratives (Gen 12:16; etc.) of Genesis are “anachronistic,” or historically out of place, because there is allegedly no evidence for camel domestication before the tenth century BC. This claim is actually not new, since it was made by W. F. Albright over seventy years ago, but is it true?  

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A Commentary for the Hard Questions

By John McKinley Jan. 9, 2014 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament

When I was a research student holed up in a windowless office in the library for a year, the PhD student next to my office was Jeremy Howard. While I struggled through stacks of research trying to avoid drowning in the historical theology portion of my dissertation, Jeremy was blazing through the writing of his dissertation on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics and its use for Christian apologetics. His research world couldn’t have been farther away from mine. Years later, he has recently piloted a work that fits a gap I didn’t know I was looking for. To pass on an introduction to this new series, I interviewed the general editor, Jeremy Howard with several questions here.

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Does a Denial of a Historical Adam Impact Other Christian Doctrines?

By Kenneth Berding Dec. 19, 2013 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Culture, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament, Old Testament, Theology

Yes. If you deny that Adam was a historical person it negatively impacts other Christian doctrines. An affirmation of the historicity of Adam positively and necessarily connects with a number of key Christian doctrines.

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The Secret to C.S. Lewis' Success

By Thaddeus Williams Oct. 23, 2013 4:48 p.m. Apologetics, Ministry and Leadership, Spiritual Formation, Theology

I recently watched a disturbing video. A camera caught the head of a certain political organization; we’ll call him Lucius, attempting to convince a packed auditorium about the reality of moral law. Specifically, Lucius appealed to a real moral law above and beyond culture to argue against a right to homosexual marriage. What struck me most was less of what he said and more how he said it. Lucius taunted the crowd relentlessly, hurling insults like hand grenades. People often argue against moral reality by appealing to moral reality (e.g., there can’t be absolutes because look at out how absolutely wrong the crusades and inquisitions were!). But there is an equal and opposite inconsistency, namely, arguing for moral reality while breaking the very morality we are defending (e.g., real morals like ‘love your neighbor’ exist, you ignoramus!). In other words, Lucius’ problem was that he did not argue his worldview as if his worldview were actually true. No matter what he said, the way in which he said it made it seem like morals like love and respect were not to be taken seriously after all. The medium refuted the message.

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Every Bible Translation Does What?!

By Kenneth Berding Sep. 4, 2013 12:51 p.m. Apologetics, Church Life, New Testament, Old Testament, Theology

Dave Brunn recently gave a gift to the English-speaking church in his book One Bible, Many Versions: Are All Translations Created Equal? (IVP, 2013). Dave Brunn is a professional translator and trainer of translator-wannabes within New Tribes Mission.  To the best of my knowledge, he has never worked on an English-language translation project.  His translational claim to fame is a translation of the Bible (done alongside dedicated national co-translators) into Lamogai, one of the multitude of languages in Papua New Guinea.  Consequently, Dave Brunn brings an outsider’s perspective to our recent English translation battles.  (You know what I’m talking about, the “mine is the best translation and all others are suspect” battles.)  And his outsider’s perspective is clarifying and challenging.

Here is a summary of the book, in the author’s own words (from pages 189-190), focusing on what translations share, rather than how they differ.

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