Posts in Ethics

Why You Shouldn’t Tell your Children that Santa Claus is Real

By Kenneth Berding Dec. 18, 2014 9:00 a.m. Christian Education, Church Life, Culture, Ethics, Marriage and Family, Theology

A few evenings ago, we hosted a delightful group of ten Biola students at our house for dinner. During dessert, we launched into a lively discussion about how we should celebrate Christmas as Christians. We discussed various sub-topics under this broader question, but we spent the largest portion of our time talking about how Christians should—and should not—talk to their children about Santa Claus.


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The Christian, Torture, and Intercessory Prayer: The Gist and a Christian Ethics Reading List

By Andy Draycott Dec. 11, 2014 11:00 a.m. Church Life, Culture, Ethics, New Testament, Theology, Historical Theology

Readers of this blog may be interested in the short article I have written over at Reformation 21. The gist of my claim is that the person of Jesus Christ shapes our primary ethical response to torture and our attitude to its perpetration by our authorities. Person, that is, over procedure, particularly over fear based consequentialist reasoning that might allow in extremis the ends of security to justify the means of torture. I very minimally offer that the health of our moral imaginations as Christian citizens is attested to in our habits of corporate prayer.

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The Morality of the Current Conflict in Israel

By Mitch Glaser Aug. 18, 2014 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, Culture, Ethics, Missions, Old Testament, Theology

Perhaps the real question our friends are asking is this: “What impact does our faith as Messianic Jews have on our support of Israel?” This is a fair question, and it is a reasonable assumption that most Jews who believe in Jesus support the Jewish state.

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How Can You Discern Whether an Overseer is “Free From the Love of Money”?

By Kenneth Berding Aug. 6, 2014 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, Christian Education, Church Life, Ethics, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament, Spiritual Formation

One of the qualifications for an overseer/elder/pastor (all the same office in the Bible) is that he be “free from the love of money” (1 Tim. 3:3). Now suppose that you are on an elder board and seeking to know whether a new candidate for the office is in fact free from the love of money, how can you figure it out? Here are five useful diagnostic questions.

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What’s the Purpose of a Christian Business? Can You Make a Profit and Make a Difference?

By Scott Rae Jun. 4, 2014 9:00 a.m. Culture, Ethics, Philosophy

Dr. Scott Rae tackles the question, "What is the appropriate role for business to play in society?"


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Thoughts on the New Testament and Economics

By Scott Rae Mar. 24, 2014 9:00 a.m. Ethics, New Testament, Old Testament, Philosophy

Though the New Testament is not a textbook on economics, it was immersed in a particular economic environment and much of the New Testament teaching had implications for economic life. In the New Testament, Jesus takes up right where the Old Testament prophets left off. Care for the poor was just as important to Jesus as it was to the prophets. When the followers of John the Baptist (who was in prison at the time) asked Jesus if He was indeed the Messiah who was to come, He answered in terms that could have been taken right out of the prophets. He put it like this, “Go back to John (the Baptist) and tell him what you have seen and heard—the blind see, the lame walk, the lepers are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are being raised to life and the good news is being preached to the poor” (Matt. 11:4-5). The evidence that Jesus was who He claimed to be was not only that He did miracles, but who were the beneficiaries of those miracles were: the poor, marginalized and vulnerable. Similarly, when He spoke of final judgment and what would separate His true followers from the pretenders, He made it clear that how someone treats the poor is a critical indication of a person’s spiritual maturity. This is likely what Jesus meant when He said that, “I tell you the truth, when you did it to the least of these my brothers, you were doing it to me” (referring to feeding the hungry and taking in the needy, Matt. 25:40).

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“Let the One Who Has No Sword, Buy One”: The Biblical Argument for Gun Control, Part Two

By Moyer Hubbard Feb. 25, 2014 9:00 a.m. Culture, Ethics, New Testament, Theology

This is the second post in a series of blogs dealing with gun control from a Christian perspective. In the first installment (“Seek the Welfare of the City”), I sketched the general theological case for sane restriction on guns, particularly assault weapons, and applied biblical principles to common objections. Now I will begin looking at biblical texts used by Christian gun advocates to support their view that Scripture supports unrestricted access to lethal weaponry for private individuals. In this installment I examine Luke 22:36, where Jesus tells his disciples, “And let the one who has no sword sell his cloak and buy one.”

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