Posts in Historical Theology

Sharing the Material Resources of Home to Embody the Gospel

By Aaron Devine Oct. 21, 2014 9:15 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Biblical Exposition, Church Life, Culture, Evangelism, Marriage and Family, Ministry and Leadership, Missions, New Testament, Old Testament

I often think about home in a specific way. For a long time, home has been a safe place to come back to at the end of the day. It has been a place to establish a comfortable niche in the world as a respite, a literal financial investment in emotional well being. Home has been about rest and nurture, as it can be a place of ministry to family and friends. It also has been a place to launch out into kingdom ministry more broadly.

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Women and the Office of Deacon: Part 1

By John McKinley Oct. 9, 2014 9:00 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Church Life, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament

An opportunity for expressing the complementarity of men and women in the church is to promote women to the office of Deacon. Controversy accompanies the question of women and the office of Deacon, so the opportunity is lost in many churches. In what follows, I will present the arguments about 1 Timothy 3:11 (as referring to women Deacons or not) and propose a way this office can be promoted for greater expression of complementarianism in the church. In a companion post to follow soon, I will present the related question of what the Deacon role is.

 

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A Theology of Inequality through Jonathan Edwards

By Uche Anizor Sep. 15, 2014 9:00 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Biblical Exposition, New Testament

Inequality is not necessarily inequity. Often talk related to disparities in income, opportunities, education, skills—you name it—centers on the issue of justice or equity. However, it may be that justice or injustice has little to do with inequalities. As in all matters, it is helpful to get somewhat of a God’s eye view on this rather easily misunderstood issue. What I’d like to do is briefly draw attention to one strand of biblical teaching worth considering as we discuss matters of inequality. I’ll do this with the help of Edwards and his eschatology.

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A Canonical Approach to the Catholic Epistles?

By Darian Lockett Sep. 11, 2014 9:00 a.m. Historical Theology, New Testament

The Letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude constitute one of the final frontiers in New Testament studies. Whereas the four Gospels and Paul’s letters have received copious attention, these seven letters, in comparison, constitute the distant shores of a largely unknown world. It is not uncommon to search in vain for substantive treatment of any one of these letters in the standard introductions or theologies of the New Testament. While one can find a handful of introductory texts focusing on “the latter New Testament” or “Hebrews through Revelation,” there are precious few devoted specifically to the Letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude, and almost all fail to consider the possibility of interpreting the Catholic Epistles as a discrete collection.[1] Though considering the canonical collections of the “Gospels” and the “Pauline Epistles,” even the groundbreaking Dictionary for the Theological Interpretation of the Bible (2005) fails to supply an entry for the Catholic Epistles ...

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When The Group Comes First

By Joe Hellerman Sep. 4, 2014 9:30 a.m. Historical Theology, Biblical Exposition, Church Life, Culture, Ministry and Leadership, New Testament, Old Testament

I recently read a fascinating book by Richard Nisbett, who compares and contrasts contemporary Asian and Western worldviews. It just so happens that the strong-group mentality of Nisbett’s Asian culture corresponds in some important ways to the mindset of people in the New Testament world.

 

 

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A Short Book Review of One of the Longest Books I’ve Ever Read

By Kenneth Berding Jul. 22, 2014 9:00 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Biblical Exposition, New Testament, Old Testament

After six months of on-and-off reading, I have just completed N.T. Wright’s book, Paul and the Faithfulness of God.  The book is 1660 pages long if you include the bibliography and indices.  (If you don’t it’s only 50 pages long…just kidding.)  Here are three things I liked about this two-volume book, and two things that I struggled with.

 
 
 

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What a Difference a Century and a Half Can Make!

By Kenneth Berding Jul. 8, 2014 9:00 a.m. Historical Theology, Christian Education, Church Life, Culture, New Testament, Old Testament, Spiritual Formation

In 19th century England, Atheists knew more about the Bible than most Christians do today. So did Liberal Anglicans, Anglo-Catholics, Unitarians, and Agnostics. So claims Timothy Larsen in A People of One Book: The Bible and the Victorians (Oxford, 2011) ...

 
 
 
 

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