Posts in Historical Theology

A Short Book Review of One of the Longest Books I’ve Ever Read

By Kenneth Berding Jul. 22, 2014 9:00 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Biblical Exposition, New Testament, Old Testament

After six months of on-and-off reading, I have just completed N.T. Wright’s book, Paul and the Faithfulness of God.  The book is 1660 pages long if you include the bibliography and indices.  (If you don’t it’s only 50 pages long…just kidding.)  Here are three things I liked about this two-volume book, and two things that I struggled with.

 
 
 

Read More

What a Difference a Century and a Half Can Make!

By Kenneth Berding Jul. 8, 2014 9:00 a.m. Historical Theology, Christian Education, Church Life, Culture, New Testament, Old Testament, Spiritual Formation

In 19th century England, Atheists knew more about the Bible than most Christians do today. So did Liberal Anglicans, Anglo-Catholics, Unitarians, and Agnostics. So claims Timothy Larsen in A People of One Book: The Bible and the Victorians (Oxford, 2011) ...

 
 
 
 

Read More

Blood Moons and the End of the World

By Mark Saucy Apr. 17, 2014 4:15 p.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Culture, New Testament, Old Testament

... I’m all in favor of blood moons (awe-inspiring astronomical phenomenon!), tetrads (rare!), Jewish feasts (our overly Gentilized Church calendars should be more dominated by these—as they are fulfilled in Christ), and apocalyptic (it can be literal too—resurrection is a feature of apocalyptic and we all believe in that one). But put them together in yet another sensationalized, factually crazy, books-flying-off-the-shelf spectacle for the world, and I just shake my head.  We’re in the same ditch as those who have no hope ...

 

Read More

Wright On?, Part One

By Joe Hellerman Jan. 7, 2014 9:00 a.m. Theology, Historical Theology, New Testament, Old Testament

One of my self-imposed projects over the January break is to read through N. T. Wright’s (most recent) magnum opus, Paul and the Faithfulness of God. The work is actually two separate books (@ 600 and 1200 pages, respectively!). Book I is primarily concerned with backgrounds, and Paul’s worldview vis-à-vis paganism and Judaism. Book II deals with Paul’s theology and more directly engages the text of his letters.

Read More

Talbot and Inerrancy

By Clint Arnold Dec. 10, 2013 1:30 p.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Christian Education

“The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are without error or misstatement in their moral and spiritual teaching and record of historical facts. They are without error or defect of any kind.” Thus reads Biola University’s (and Talbot School of Theology’s) Articles of Faith—a document that remains unchanged since it was written shortly after the turn of the century. As the Dean of Talbot and as one who has been on the faculty for 27 years, I can say that this is a conviction that runs very deep in our faculty. We believe that the Bible is the Word of God and, as such, is truthful in what it affirms and can be completely trusted. 

Read More

Book Review: The Aleppo Codex (by Matti Friedman)

By Tom Finley Nov. 19, 2013 9:00 a.m. Historical Theology, Culture, Old Testament

Is it possible for a true story about an ancient manuscript of the Hebrew Bible to be thrilling

Read More

El día de la Reforma / Reformation Day

By Octavio Esqueda Nov. 2, 2013 1:39 p.m. Theology, Historical Theology, Church Life, Evangelism, Ministry and Leadership

El 31 de octubre de 1517 Martín Lutero clavó en las puertas de la catedral de Wittenberg en Alemania 95 tesis en las que criticaba abiertamente las ventas de indulgencias de la iglesia católica romana. Lutero inicialmente no tenía la intención de romper con la iglesia romana sino enfatizar la supremacía del evangelio basada en su simplicidad y a la vez en su gran profundidad. El evangelio o las buenas noticias de la salvación en Cristo es el fundamento esencial de la fe cristiana y desgraciadamente se había pervertido convirtiéndose en una práctica totalmente ajena a su esencia. De manera que, las indulgencias eran una distorsión absoluta del evangelio y, por lo tanto, dignas de ser repudiadas con severidad. Como resultado de esta acción, Lutero inició el movimiento conocido como la Reforma Protestante y cada 31 de octubre se conmemora como el Día de la Reforma. 

Read More

Page 1 of 7