Posts in Historical Theology

Do We Need Another Reformation?

By Thaddeus Williams Oct. 31, 2015 4:29 p.m. Church Life, Culture, Evangelism, Missions, Theology, Historical Theology

The 16th century church was in dire need of a Reformation. What about today, nearly a half millennium later? Is the 21st century church due for another Reformation, a Re-Reformation? Professor Williams shares his thoughts ...

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That Crispy Part of Your Bible

By Mark Saucy Oct. 26, 2015 9:00 a.m. Christian Education, Church Life, Old Testament, Spiritual Formation, Theology, Historical Theology

You know that part of your Bible where the gold leaf on the pages still looks pretty fresh? Some of the pages might still even be stuck together. Or, more au courant, the portion you rarely scroll to on your phone or iPad … That’s right, for most of us it’s that part of the Bible starting right after Psalms and going all the way to Matthew. A lot of prophets big and little, and a good bit of Israel’s Wisdom tradition—but it just doesn’t get a lot of air-time in most evangelical churches or personal Bible-reading. Now, I’m the first to admit that last claim stems from my own highly subjective internal polling data, and I’m glad to be proven wrong; but I don’t think I am, because I know a good bit of it’s true in my own life ...

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Remembering Edward John Carnell—Some Reflections of a Great Apologist

By Doug Geivett Aug. 5, 2015 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Christian Education, Culture, Historical Theology

On April 25, 1967, the church lost a great Christian philosopher and apologist named Edward John Carnell. He was almost 48 years old. Today marks the 48th anniversary of his death. He was a graduate of Wheaton College and of Westminster Theological Seminary. He later earned doctoral degrees in theology and philosophy, at Harvard Divinity School and Boston University, respectively ...

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Arnold Lunn (1888-1974) – Skiing Expert, Agnostic, and Christian Apologist

By Doug Geivett Jul. 29, 2015 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Church Life, Culture, Ethics, Historical Theology

Arnold Lunn was born to a Methodist minister, but he was himself agnostic and a critic of Christianity—until he was 45 years old, when he converted to the faith. Lunn died on June 2, 1974.

Lunn was a professional skier and full-time enthusiast. He founded the Alpine Ski Club and the Kandahar Ski Club. He brought slalom skiing to the racing world, and he’s the namesake for a double black diamond ski trail at Taos Ski Valley.

Lunn credited his agnosticism to the wholly unconvincing cause of Anglicanism. He looked in vain for persuasive arguments for the existence of God and the truth of Christianity. Later he would say that “an odd hour or two at the end of a boy’s school life might not be unprofitably spend in armouring him against the half-baked dupes of ill informed secularists” (The Third Day, xvii). He wrote in criticism of the faith and debated Christianity’s prominent defenders ...

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W. H. Griffith Thomas (1861-1924) – How We Got Our Bible

By Doug Geivett Jul. 22, 2015 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Church Life, Culture, Historical Theology

Born in 1861, W. H. Griffith Thomas died on June 2, 1924. His greatest and most sophisticated work is his book The Principles of Theology, a commentary on the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Anglican Church. But one short and reader-friendly book that should interest students of Christian apologetics is How We Got Our Bible ...

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The Great Dane—Remembering Kierkegaard

By Doug Geivett Jul. 15, 2015 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Culture, Philosophy, Historical Theology

Søren Kierkegaard was born May 5, 1813, in Copenhagen, Denmark. He’s been called a Christian existentialist, a fideist, a satirist, and “the melancholy Dane.” He was concerned about the disconnect between Christian profession and the lived reality of true Christianity. He called his contemporaries to a deeper personal encounter with God. And he wrote with penetrating insight about the failure of the purely aesthetic life—what we today might call secularism—which seeks pleasure without discerning its natural and ultimate end, namely, despair. Kierkegaard’s contribution is considerable, even for the evidentialist. In fact, his sermonic style may be of value to the apologist who insists on the value of evidence. E. J. Carnell, mid-twentieth century, did the most to bring Kierkegaard’s insight into an overall “combinationalist” approach to apologetics. Carnell wrote: “There can be no question that Søren Kierkegaard gave a profoundly convincing defense of the third locus of truth.

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Melanchthon’s Message: Understanding Christian Fellowship

By Frederick Cardoza Jul. 6, 2015 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, Christian Education, Church Life, Ministry and Leadership, Historical Theology

... Because of the importance of Christian fellowship, it is important to distinguish biblical guidelines to guide and govern our interactions with other professing believers. This is especially true in a world such as ours, where there exists tremendous diversity in the beliefs and behaviors among those who call themselves Christians ...


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