Posts in New Testament

Together With Them – Hebrews 13:3

By Dave Talley Nov. 26, 2015 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Marriage and Family, New Testament, Spiritual Formation

Voice of the Martyrs has offered an excellent idea for those who may be travelling during this Thanksgiving season or who might be looking for some special activities to do while gathered with families and friends. 

Read More

Metaphors Revealing the Holy Spirit, Part Two: The Wind as a Metaphor of the Holy Spirit

By John McKinley Nov. 18, 2015 9:00 a.m. New Testament, Theology

In part 2 of this blog series, I present the second biblical metaphor revealing the Holy Spirit: the wind. We need to discern what the metaphor is, and what its meanings are within the biblical and ANE framework. I will be drawing some details from the Dictionary of Biblical Imagery. My goal is to recognize patterns of meaning that may be intended to expand our understanding of the Holy Spirit’s presence and action in subtle ways hinted at through metaphors ...

Read More

Walking with Jesus in the Midst of Life’s Relentlessness

By Joy Mosbarger Nov. 16, 2015 9:00 a.m. New Testament, Theology

There are times for all of us when we feel bruised and battered by the relentlessness of life. We long for respite, a chance to catch our breath before the next project or crisis consumes us. But often, life’s challenges are unremitting. They just keep on coming! ...

Read More

Why Classical Christian Educators Should Teach Greek Instead of Latin

By Kenneth Berding Nov. 9, 2015 9:00 a.m. Christian Education, New Testament, Old Testament

Classical Christian education programs are on the rise. I am heartened that so many parents want their children to get a strong education that draws upon all that is wonderful, winsome, and wise from the past. But Latin instead of Greek? Are you serious? Come on, teachers and parents. Feel free to add Latin later if you’re so inclined, but really you should start with Greek. Here are eight (well … sort-of eight) reasons why Greek ought to be the core language you teach in your Classical Christian education program instead of Latin ...

Read More

The “Cool” Factor

By Joe Hellerman Nov. 4, 2015 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Culture, Ministry and Leadership, Missions, New Testament

I came to Christ as a last resort after a year-long quest to find God back in 1975. With two thriving evangelical churches just a few blocks from my doorstep, why did I explore the Christian faith last instead of first? The cool factor, of course! I was a long-haired, pot-smoking keyboard player in a rock band. Eastern and New Age religion were “spiritual” and cool — Christianity definitely was not ...

Read More

What Did the New Testament Authors Really Care About?

Nov. 2, 2015 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, New Testament, Theology

What Did the New Testament Authors Really Care About? The easiest way we know to answer that question is to pick up Matt Williams’s and Ken Berding’s (editors) book:  What the New Testament Authors Really Cared About: A Survey of Their Writings.  The second edition has just been released by Kregel in an attractive full-color format with some added materials ...

Read More

Did the Apostle Paul Use Profanity?

By Gary Manning Jr Oct. 1, 2015 3:21 p.m. New Testament

In Philippians 3:8, the apostle Paul compares his religious credentials to knowing Jesus. The difference could hardly be more emphatic: “knowing Christ Jesus my Lord” is of “surpassing value,” but Paul’s past success is like σκύβαλα (skubala). σκύβαλα is commonly translated as rubbish, refuse, or garbage, but sometimes more strongly as dung, in both ancient and modern translations (Vulgate, Tyndale, KJV, NET). Some have suggested another four-letter translation, stronger than dung.

While teaching Greek, I used to say that σκύβαλα is the closest thing to a swear word you can find in the New Testament - and I was repeating something that I had heard or read quite a few times. C. Spicq's Greek lexicon even suggests that σκύβαλα should be rendered crap. But is it true? Is σκύβαλα a swear word, or maybe a rude word? Or is it unobjectionable?

Read More

Page 1 of 33