To What Extent Should Pastors be "Culturally Savvy" and Attune to the Trends? How Far is Too Far?

Mar. 2, 2015 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Culture, Evangelism, Ministry and Leadership

Talbot faculty member, James Petitfils, and a panel of Talbot graduates who are now pastors in Southern California discuss to what extent pastors should be "culturally savvy."

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Incarnation and Omniscience

By William Lane Craig Feb. 27, 2015 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Philosophy

Dear Dr. William Lane Craig,

... My question is about the model of the Incarnation you and J.P. Moreland present in Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview, which states that many of the divine attributes of Jesus were located in his subconsciousness. I'm having a problem with this. Maximal greatness would seem to me to imply having access to any and all knowledge on the spot, which would in turn seem to imply that God would have omniscience in His consciousness, where all the knowledge can be directly accessed. Can you please clear this up for me?

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Salvation in James: Gift and Responsibility, Part Two

By Darian Lockett Feb. 25, 2015 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, New Testament, Theology, Historical Theology

In this series of posts, we attempt to offer a rich and appreciative reading of James chapter 1 and 2 with an eye to James’ theology of human redemption—a Jacobian soteriology. In the previous post, we considered the function of the “word” and the “law” as God’s gracious gifts for salvation. Here we specifically looked at James 1:18 and 21 and concluded that this “word of truth” and “implanted word” thus is a new character, a new heart’s disposition created in us. It must be received (1:21) and, as the “law of freedom” it must be obeyed (1:22-25). Thus, the “word/law” in James is God’s instrument for salvation—it is both gift and responsibility. In this second post we will focus on James 2:12-13 where “mercy” triumphs over judgment. 

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Church Report: Spiritual Formation Assignment, Part 4

By Charlie Trimm Feb. 24, 2015 9:00 a.m. Christian Education, Church Life, Spiritual Formation

Although most Biola students have grown up in the church, a surprising number of undergraduates (especially freshmen and sophomores) do not attend church. Students cite a variety of reasons for this, including busyness, lack of transportation, difficulty of settling into a church, receiving Bible instruction through Bible classes and required chapel attendance, and lack of depth in relationships when they attend church. Recognizing that these students do face legitimate difficulties, I created an assignment requiring them to attend the same church four times over the course of the semester and answer a series of questions about the church for the purpose of helping them think through how they should pick a new church. I’ve included the questions below. I’d love to hear any feedback on them!

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How Can Pastors Respond to Church Shopping Mentality and Consumer Approaches to Faith?

Feb. 23, 2015 9:00 a.m. Church Life, Ministry and Leadership, Spiritual Formation

Talbot faculty member, James Petitfils, and a panel of Talbot graduates who are now pastors in Southern California talk about the ways that pastors can respond to "church shopping" and a consumeristic mentality about faith.

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Indonesia Air Asia QZ8501 and the Problem of Evil

By William Lane Craig Feb. 20, 2015 9:00 a.m. Apologetics, Philosophy

Dear Dr. Craig,

... My question is regarding one of the latest news. I am an Indonesian living in Surabaya and the QZ8501 accident has had a huge impact on me. But most of all it was a great shock for a friend of mine. She is a Christian attending Mawar Sharon church with her parents. They were such wonderful persons, as well as a good Christian. But then they were traveling on QZ8501, while my friend stayed at home. You know the rest of the story ...

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Salvation in James: Gift and Responsibility, Part One

By Darian Lockett Feb. 18, 2015 9:00 a.m. Biblical Exposition, New Testament, Theology, Historical Theology

I suspect for many readers of the New Testament that the Letter of James is something like the odd uncle at a family Christmas party who unfortunately suffers from chronic halitosis. Someone you rather not talk with, but in the end you are related—and thus might owe the obligatory yearly conversation.

Well, if this does not accurately describe the church’s reception of James, it certainly represents the attitude of many scholars. For example, Andrew Chester notes “James presents a unique problem within the New Testament ...

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